Hail Impact Doesn’t Always Damage Shingles

Posted by in Shingles | October 24, 2016

Just because shingles were impacted by hail doesn’t mean that they were damaged by hail.

Hail damage to asphalt shingle roofs is characterized by localized loss of granules, usually somewhat circular in shape, and accompanied by a fracture or a bruise in the shingle mat.  A fracture appears as a break or crack in the asphalt.  A bruise is a softness in the shingle mat: it feels similar to the feel of a bruise on an apple.  The bruise is indicative of a hidden fracture in the shingle mat.

The lack of localized areas of granule loss which are circular in shape and which are accompanied by a fracture or a bruise in the shingle mat indicate that the shingles on the roof have not been functionally damaged as a result of hail impact.  That is, the function of the shingles has not been affected, the expected service life of the shingles has not been reduced, nor has the appearance of the shingles been affected as a result of recent hail impacts.  A small amount of granule loss is considered non-functional damage, that is, normal wear and tear.  Granules are commonly dislodged when the roof covering is exposed to weather events, such as, heavy rainfall, wind, small hail impacts, and foot traffic.

Here are photos of shingles (featured photo and Figures 1 and 2) where the accumulation of dirt on the shingles has been abraded in spots by hail impacts, but the shingles have not been functionally damaged.

Figure 1 Spatter (splash) marks on shingles.

Figure 1 Spatter (splash) marks on shingles.

Figure 2 Spatter (splash) marks on shingles.

Figure 2 Spatter (splash) marks on shingles.

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