Even a Slate Roof Can Be Damaged by Hail

Posted by in Hail Damage, Roof | June 01, 2020

Slate tile roof coverings are more expensive than common composite asphalt shingle roof coverings and for good reason: slate is more attractive (this is a personal preference), slate tiles last much longer (50-100 years or more depending on the quality of the slate), and slate is more resistant to the effects of weather, even such weather events as high winds and hail impacts.

But, despite their better resistance to hail impacts, slate tiles CAN be damaged by hail impacts when the hail is hard enough and/or large enough.

Hail impacts can puncture slate tile (see the featured photograph and Figures 1 through 3).

Hail punctures in slate tile exhibit relatively circular and shape with clean fracture surfaces
Figure 1 Hail punctures in slate tile exhibit relatively circular and shape with clean fracture surfaces.
Hail puncture in slate tile exhibit relatively circular and shape with clean fracture surfaces
Figure 2 Hail puncture in slate tile exhibits relatively circular and shape with clean fracture surfaces.
Hail puncture in slate tile exhibits relatively circular and shape with clean fracture surfaces
Figure 3 Hail puncture in slate tile exhibits relatively circular and shape with clean fracture surfaces.

Hail impacts can even fracture slate tile (see the featured photograph and Figure 4).

Hail fracture in slate tile exhibits relatively circular puncture and clean fracture surfaces
Figure 4 Hail fracture in slate tile exhibits relatively circular puncture and clean fracture surfaces.

Evidence of hail impact damage to slate tile usually includes a somewhat circular shape within the damage, relatively clean fracture surfaces, crushing, a somewhat conical shape of the fracture surface (like a BB punchout in a glass pane), and/or a widespread pattern facing a particular direction.

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